‘Glass’ breaks movie standards

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‘Glass’ breaks movie standards

M. Night Shyamalan is known for his dramatic and captivating movies. “Signs,” “The Sixth Sense” and “The Happening” prove that the director has mastered the art of surprise endings. You’ll never expect what twist he will play next. His latest movie “Glass” is no different.

“Glass” is the third installment in the “Unbreakable” series. The movie is based around superheros, but with a different approach. Unlike Marvel films, there isn’t any need for special effects or flamboyant action scenes. Instead, “Glass” takes a deeper and more methodical approach to the typical comic book story.

The movie revolves around characters who possess superhuman abilities but they question whether their powers are truly real. The plot is far better and unique for a superhero story. We watch as their doubts and weaknesses play out into the plot.

“Glass” has an outstanding cast that is able to express the mindset of each complex character. Samuel L. Jackson, James McAvoy, and Bruce Willis display their superb acting talent. Together, they show how emotionally driven the movie is. Their performances add a much needed level of detail for their characters. It’s impossible to look away from McAvoy’s performance. His character, Kevin Wendell Crumb, suffers from multiple personalities.

McAvoy not only plays this character but the several other personalities. His versatile acting allows the audience to witness the 23 different personalities. The performance is breathtaking. Every time he switches personalities the audience cowers in fear. The idea of his character is creative and fascinating but sinister as well.

The level of talent from the actors and the director made “Glass” a must-see thriller. Besides the stellar performances, the movie is deeply interactive. As the audience, you are invested into the film. Gaps installed into the climax allows the ending twist to be completely unpredictable, although these holes create an unsatisfying end to the series. “Glass” is an unsettling experience that needs to be seen.

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