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Writers learn to express emotions with poetry

Junior+Denise+Morando+goes+over+which+pieces+of+writing+she+wants+to+submit+to+the+Literary+Magazine+for+publication.+One+of+her+writings+titled+%E2%80%9CI+Protest%2C%E2%80%9D+made+it+to+the+book+which+captured+the+day+of+the+unplanned+protest.
Junior Denise Morando goes over which pieces of writing she wants to submit to the Literary Magazine for publication. One of her writings titled “I Protest,” made it to the book which captured the day of the unplanned protest.

Junior Denise Morando goes over which pieces of writing she wants to submit to the Literary Magazine for publication. One of her writings titled “I Protest,” made it to the book which captured the day of the unplanned protest.

Sara Abdeltawab

Sara Abdeltawab

Junior Denise Morando goes over which pieces of writing she wants to submit to the Literary Magazine for publication. One of her writings titled “I Protest,” made it to the book which captured the day of the unplanned protest.

Many poets write for the sake of expressing their strong feelings in a positive way. But for Tyler Romuar, a senior, it’s also a way for him to start opening up to others. Romuar became interested in the eccentricities of poetry in eighth grade after attending a convention, where he would have to pick apart poems and analyze them.

He became intrigued by the messages burrowed beneath the surface of a poem, and the way he could express his thoughts or emotions in a unique style, with a unique format. Romuar also enjoys the different literary devices that he can sprinkle throughout his works and the rhythm he can create through a rhyme scheme. All those different aspects merged together Romuar believes captures the interest of the audience.

“They read it and like how it sounds because when you read a bunch of words on paper you can get bored and tired.”

In high school he decided to enroll in the Creative Writing and Production class, and he has steadily been crawling out of his shell to share his writing. Romuar has been self conscious of his works, afraid of ridicule he may face from peers. Despite his fears he continues to write poems, wanting to share.
“I try my best to be open with others.”

Junior Denise Morando is motivated for similar reasons, writing poetry not only as an outlet for her emotions, but also to connect with others.

Morando has always had a special place in her heart for poetry, and she started writing her own at 15. Not only is she in the Creative Writing and Production class, but she also writes some pieces in her free time. The class has given her a platform from which she can share her poetry and branch out instead of keeping her words to herself.

She plans to continue sharing her poetry even after high school, wanting her poems to provide support or advice for those who may find it valuable.

“If someone comes to me for advice, I can say ‘well read this, maybe it will make you feel better.’”
Morando enjoys writing poems about a variety of subjects, from events currently affecting the world, to more personal matters in her life, to things that simply catch her imagination. One of the subjects that she focuses on frequently in her poetry is beauty standards and also the importance of inner beauty.

“It’s a circuit for my emotions, just being able to get it out on paper and share it with other people who might feel the same way as me.”

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Writers learn to express emotions with poetry